NEWS

Conference at the Mount on ‘phage’ viruses draws about 100

April 24, 2018
NEWBURGH, N.Y. -

William R. Jacobs, Jr. a professor of Microbiology and Immunology and professor of Genetics at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx, gave the keynote speech at the SEA-PHAGES Symposium at Mount Saint Mary College on April 14.

William R. Jacobs, Jr. a professor of Microbiology and Immunology and professor of Genetics at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx, gave the keynote speech at the SEA-PHAGES Symposium at Mount Saint Mary College on April 14.

 

Science students from ten tristate area schools descended upon Mount Saint Mary College in Newburgh, N.Y. for the 2018 NYC Regional SEA-PHAGES Symposium on Saturday, April 14. 

“SEA-PHAGES” stands for Science Education Alliance - Phage Hunters Advancing Genomics and Evolutionary Science. A bacteriophage, also known informally as a phage, is a virus that infects and replicates within bacteria.

About 100 participants enjoyed a poster symposium featuring student research into viruses, as well as a keynote address by William R. Jacobs, Jr. a professor of Microbiology and Immunology and professor of Genetics at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx, N.Y. Jacobs is also a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator. 

His speech, “Why Mycobacteria Phages Will Lead to the Eradication of Tuberculosis,” was an interactive one, with Jacobs calling on members of the audience to share their scientific knowledge and experiences. 

“My lifelong passion is viruses,” said Jacobs. “I’m delighted to see so many of you working with and interested in them.”

The event was sponsored by the Mount’s Division of Natural Science, and the college’s Tri-Beta and Gamma Sigma Epsilon honor societies.

At the Mount, students can take a course called The Science of Viral Discovery. It is a classroom-based undergraduate research experience that introduces students to concepts and methods involved in scientific discovery. Using state-of-the-art technology, the students isolate, identify, and characterize bacteriophages.