NEWS

Mount HEOP students attend leadership convention

March 11, 2019
NEWBURGH, N.Y. -

Three HEOP students and two administrators from Mount Saint Mary College recently attended the Student Leadership Diversity Convention in San Francisco. From left: Andres Carpio, HEOP academic counselor; Giselle Martinez of Newburgh, N.Y.; Stephanie Ortiz of Elmhurst, N.Y.; Ashely Mejia of the Bronx, N.Y.; and Kelvin Herrera-Hassan, Mount HEOP director.

Three HEOP students and two administrators from Mount Saint Mary College recently attended the Student Leadership Diversity Convention in San Francisco. From left: Andres Carpio, HEOP academic counselor; Giselle Martinez of Newburgh, N.Y.; Stephanie Ortiz of Elmhurst, N.Y.; Ashely Mejia of the Bronx, N.Y.; and Kelvin Herrera-Hassan, Mount HEOP director.

Three Mount Saint Mary College students from the Higher Education Opportunity Program (HEOP) represented the college last month at the National Student Leadership Diversity Convention in San Francisco, Calif.
 
The convention, hosted by San Francisco State University, is the largest national gathering of student leaders and advisors that focuses on diversity and inclusion in American colleges.
 
The Mount attendees, who serve on the HEOP Leadership Council, were Giselle Martinez of Newburgh, N.Y.; Ashely Mejia of the Bronx, N.Y.; and Stephanie Ortiz of Elmhurst, N.Y. They were joined by Kelvin Herrera-Hassan, Mount HEOP director; and Andres Carpio, Mount HEOP academic counselor.
 
Every year, HEOP “takes our Leadership Council members to a student leadership conference so that they can have the experience of interacting with other student leaders and professionals to exchange ideas and best practices, while also networking for the future,” explained Carpio. The convention “not only taught our students about the importance of diversity and inclusivity while leading, but also instilled confidence in our students to want to come back to campus and make changes within HEOP.”
 
HEOP provides educational opportunities and support to traditionally underserved students who have strong academic potential, but would otherwise be excluded from higher education due to circumstances of academic and economic disadvantage.