Degree Level:
Undergraduate
school:
Division of Mathematics and Information Technology
Learning Mode:
On Campus
Degree:
Major

Bachelor of Science in Game Programming

Have you ever been curious about what steps went into creating your favorite video game? As a Game Programming major, you'll learn all about the game development process by analyzing professional game engines, learning scripting languages, developing artificial intelligence for non-player characters, working with graphics, networks, and various other components. If you're a creative thinker who wants to create games that captivate audiences, then you'll love being a Game Programming major.

Why be a Game Programming Major?

Here's what make the Mount's Game Programming major unique:

  • Hands-on learning: What better way to learn about creating games than by making one of your own? Throughout your courses, you'll focus on developing 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional games using computer programming languages and modern software engineering practices. Plus, you'll be able to create and design your own game from start to finish during your senior year.
  • Location, location, location: Being a short train ride to New York City is just one of the many advantages of the Mount's location. Game Programming majors at the Mount will also benefit from the Hudson Valley, and in particular Newburgh and Beacon - a hotbed for the professional arts.
  • Prepare for your career: In today's technologically advanced world, there are other careers that use emerging digital media and computing/programming technologies. At the Mount, you'll learn through an interdisciplinary approach that is infused with liberal arts emphases, allowing you to strengthen your artistic, communication, mathematical, and computational skills.

What to expect as a Game Programming Major

42 credits in Game Programming | 2.0 GPA or higher

Learn about Game Programming academic requirements and courses here.

Game Programming students will become knowledgeable in all areas of game development - after all, today's computer games are developed by teams that utilize skills in a variety of areas. First year students will start with creating game concepts, evaluating games, game testing, and even create a prototype game in their first class. Students will then learn to design and develop a game by learning advanced programming languages before enrolling in a two semester game design and development seminar that will help that student create and market their final products. In addition to hands-on interdisciplinary learning, our program prepares students to be leaders in their field by working with state-of-the-art technologies within diverse settings and populations.

Plus, you can get involved in the Mount's Gaming Group, which hosts a friendly atmosphere for students to play a variety of games on a weekly basis. They even host tournaments occasionally for prizes. There's also a focus on giving back. Students in the Gaming Group host an Extra Life gaming marathon once a year, playing games for 24 hours to raise money in support of local Children's Miracle Network hospitals.

Be Prepared for your future

The Mount's Career Center is ready to help you prepare for the industry by assisting you in finding an internship, and providing career readiness events throughout your time in college and even after graduation. Students are highly recommended to complete an internship as early as their Sophomore and Junior year and the Career Center will help with this process. Mount Game Programming majors are prepared for a variety of career opportunities including game developer, software engineer, graphics engineer, and user interface scripter.

Game Development is a fast-growing field. At the Mount, we want to make sure you have the appropriate resources to research, develop, and contribute to advances and trends within the field of game development while also having the ability to adapt to new technologies and environments.

Micah Modell

Assistant Professor of Information Technology
Contact
Email Address
[email protected]
Office
845-569-3267
Location
Aquinas 50-i
Office Hours
By Appointment

Sagar Raina

Associate Professor of Information Technology
Contact
Email Address
[email protected]
Office
845-569-3271
Location
Aquinas 50J
Office Hours
MWF
11:30am-12:30pm
Connect

Christina Alvey

Associate Professor of Mathematics and Chair of the Division of Math & IT
Contact
Email Address
[email protected]
Office
845-569-3393
Location
Aquinas 50C
Office Hours
By appointment

Denise McCarroll

Instructor of Information Technology
Contact
Email Address
[email protected]
Phone
845-569-3392
Location
Aquinas 50 D
Office Hours
MWF
10-11 am

Lee Fothergill

Professor of Mathematics
Contact
Email Address
[email protected]
Office
845-569-3347
Location
Aquinas 50F
Office Hours
MW
10-11am
TR
11am-12pm

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